Posted by & filed under Fun.

Sometimes, if you are really lucky, your client can do something pretty magical with your own product that makes it even more awesome. Just like what happened to us recently.

Didier Baquier – the creative Lead Full Stack Developer at OneUp.com – created that something special to solve his specific development requirement using the Filepicker API.

The self-acclaimed open source addict created a cool Plugin for Cordova/PhoneGap to use Filepicker’s native Android SDK.

A THRILLING

 

“We discovered Filepicker three weeks ago when we were shopping around for a solution to attach documents within our web application. The myriad of integrations really sold us,” says Didier. “We were able to fully customize and adapt the user experience for desktop, phones and tablets. The browser integration was quick to develop and it is working very well.”

ONE UP is the one-stop-place to run your small business: automatic accounting, inventory, invoicing and CRM. Their Android version, powered by Cordova (a framework to build native apps using web technologies), needed a specific plugin to use the Filepicker’s native SDK, as Didier explains;

“The goal of this plugin is to provide a native Android experience to our end users. It allows any Cordova/PhoneGap developer to start Filepicker’s Android SDK with a few lines of JavaScript and get all the information about the uploaded file in the callback function”, he says. “I matched the Filepicker’s Javascript API for the main functions (pick, pickMultiple and pickAndStore) so we can reuse our browser integration without changing anything.”

It took Didier just two days to build this plugin, and is open to offers to develop iOS support for those that need it.

Installing the Plugin:

Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 10.23.22 PM

There is a (temporary) step to add to your build.gradle (if cordova > 5.0.0) in platforms/android/build.gradle, you need to add the following line after the line 247 (in

Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 10.26.24 PM

 

Using the Plugin:

The plugin creates the object window.filepicker with the following functions available:

Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 10.27.56 PM

Response Format:

  • Container – container in S3 where the file was stored (if it was stored)
  • url – file link to uploaded file
  • filename – name of file
  • localPath – local path of file
  • key – unique key
  • mimetype – mimetype
  • size – size in bytes

note: pick() returns an object, pickMultiple() and pickAndStore() returns an array of objects

Picker Options Available:

Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 10.55.21 PM

Store Options Available:

Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 10.34.42 PM

Security Options Available:

Not implemented yet, feel free to contribute. See native SDK documentation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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fedora

Posted by & filed under Testimonial.

Fedora is a New York-based startup, founded by Ankur Nagpal and Conrad Wadowski The company was officially launched in February 2014.

What they do: Described as the Shopify for the educational market, Fedora is an e-commerce platform that enables teachers to create their own online schools and sell the class content to students through their own personal website.

What their USP is: Fedora believes that teachers should own their students, not the platforms. Other services in this space prevent teachers from seeing the email addresses of their students, for fear that they may defect from the paid-for-platform. Through Fedora, teachers can build, manage, and market their product in any way they want.

How they are growing: 5,000 + teachers globally …including the two gurus that made $1 million through selling their own courses to over 100,000 students.

 

Fedora may only be one year in operation, but it is already shaking up the billion-dollar e-learning market. And helping teachers from all industries make a lot of money along the way.

The Fedora concept is simple. Their platform enable teachers to create their own online schools, allowing them to sell their class content direct to students through their own personal websites.

The reasoning for Fedora’s break-through in this market is also quite simple. The appetite for e-learning is accelerating at an phenomenal rate, growing annually at 7.6% with revenues expected to reach $51.5 billion by 2016. Teachers naturally want a slice of the action and to tap into their ready-made audience. However, most educational platforms available are student specific, so teachers have no personal access to their email addresses. And no way of making their teaching business a real revenue earner. Until now.

Fedora, based in New York, is the brainchild of Ankur Nagpal. The entrepreneur – who made a small fortune through the creation of Facebook quizzes – identified a gap in the market for this platform when he was teaching classes through Udemy.

The first Fedora school was created for a course conducted by Conrad Wadowski, a growth hacking consultant. “I built the first version of Fedora myself..unfortunately I am only borderline technical. So we had to pretty much throw away all of the code and rebuild again,” recalls Nagpal.

Wadowski’s new school went on to generate over $50,000 in one month and he subsequently joined Fedora.

Dubbed the “Shopify” of the e-learning industry, over 5,000 teachers right across the globe are now using Fedora’s platform.

Ankur Nagpal“All of our teachers now use Filepicker as their primary tool to get their course content loaded onto our system. This includes but is not limited to videos, images, text files and icons. All of it runs through Filepicker,” adds Nagpal. “We chose Filepicker for the uploading option as we simply did not want to deal with it or build it ourselves. It is better to get someone specialized in this area to do it. We did not have to think about the process. We had the direct link and it just worked automatically.”

Over 125,000 videos have been uploaded to date by teachers, averaging now at 1,000 per day.

Five developers currently work on the platform which is now available in over nine languages.

imgur

Posted by & filed under Product Updates.

As Imgur continues to take over the image-sharing market, they have chosen Filepicker to help them achieve ultimate success.

Imgur – the “simple image sharer” – is now available on the ever-expanding Filepicker Dialog, enabling end-users to upload their files to any app that integrates with Filepicker.

 

1 - RLjbFvr

 

Imgur has been enjoying rapid growth in recent months, and thanks to a wrath of a new initiatives, their user numbers are expected to boost even further. At the moment, 150 million unique visitors flock to the platform monthly, while over 60 billion images are viewed on Imgur per month.

To tap into mobile communities, Imgur recently relaunched its iOS mobile app, with plans to roll out a new Android version soon.

Supporting third-party apps is also a core part of Imgur’s business, and hence why they are using Filepicker to help facilitate developers build beautiful, interactive and user-friendly apps.

 

Workings of Filepicker/Imgur Integration

 

If you have any questions regarding the Imgur/Filepicker integration, please email support@filepicker.io.

 

 

 

Posted by & filed under Events.

When there is cake promised, the Filepicker team will attend any networking meet-up.

And so Jason Toy, our always-hungry CEO, was one of the first to descend upon the San-Francisco Tech in Motion event last night (May 14).

The atmosphere at the meet-up was extra special as the group reached the epic 5,000 member milestone mark. Great work considering it was only established over two years ago!

As social sponsors of the night, we were in very celebratory mood…as you can see from our happy (and hungry) faces.

 

 

And the Cake!

 

Posted by & filed under Product Updates.

While you were all sleeping or on lazy coffee-breaks, our developers were like Batman and Robin fixing a library bug that was connected with the AFNetworking library.

Within 24 hours, the Filepicker iOS library was upgraded to reflect this change to version 4.2.2, while our AFNetworking library was updated to version 2.5.3.

That is how we roll at Filepicker. Developers are not allowed to sleep if they don’t find a bug and fix it quickly. Okay, this isn’t (that) true.

The bug issue was a security one. It transpired that because of a logic flaw in the latest version of the AFNetworking library, SSL MiTM attacks were feasible in apps using version 2.5.1.

Once we identified and rectified the issue, we bumped the minimum version of the AFNetworking dependency to 2.5.3.

The pros and cons of using AFNetworking –  the networking library for iOS and Mac OS X – is one that developers love only to spend hours debating over. But let’s face it, it’s one of the best developer communities out there, powering the most popular Apple apps on the market. What’s not to love? And here we are working our thing.

Example of changed file on our AFNetworking library : Podfile

Screen Shot 2015-05-14 at 3.10.57 PM

 

What to do now? Our library users will have to update to our newest version, either by updating our library or changing the version of AFNetworking in your own code.

On a side note, our developers are now using the Filepicker Twitter account to quickly announce all upgrade/product issues and news. Reach out to us if you have any queries.

 

 

 

TeamLunch

Posted by & filed under Fun.

Last Friday our team decided to go to lunch all together – and we survived!

 

Then in a twist, our Europe office countered with the Kings of Leon playing right outside their window!

Posted by & filed under Working with Filepicker.

It has been almost one month since Dropbox allowed us a sneak peak of the work-in-progress for v2 of their API.

While the preview was all bells and whistles, the overall offering (for developers anyway) is less about fuss and more about simplicity. In their words, they want to make it easier for “developers to build apps and to create SDKs.”

That is all well and good, but what impact will its v2 REALLY have on our project(s)? Integration is the obvious answer.

Like all API providers, Dropbox is simply upping the ante to ensure its API can be easily embedded into users’ ecosystems and to simplify integration of its service. Easy integration and simple code, as we at Filepicker know, is the only way to quickly and easily build great apps now.

 

As Dropbox prepares to launch v2 of its API, developers should start to prepare.

 

 

What’s new that will impact you?

Thankfully, the Datastore and Sync APIs have been deprecated in a bid to move developers to its Core API. The Sync API and SDK caused many headaches for developers, with many (accidentally) opting for Core for when they should have chosen Sync and vice versa. In v2, Dropbox will offer more syncing features, while a single solution should (hopefully) simplify development.

The Datastore API – created to support syncing of structured (nonfile) data – has not lived up to Dropbox’s aspirations in terms of adoption. The new version will thankfully sort this issue out for us.

All new Dropbox apps will use the Core API, while existing apps that use the Sync and Datastore APIs have some time to make the transition.

Dropbox will support both APIs and implement bug fixes through to October 23, 2015. As the Core API powers the Sync SDK, existing apps utilizing Sync will continue to work. But bug fixes will cease. Datastore bug fixes will end in six months, while Datastore endpoints will remain available through to April 2016.

In v2, they have also simplified its use of HTTP and the use of HTTP status codes for errors.

Why now?

Well, Dropbox has been enjoying a rapid boost in numbers of late. In the latest number count in May 2014, they hit a record 300m users. But it’s the fact that they earned 100m extra users within a six-month period to get this figure that perhaps kickstarted the rollout of v2 of its API.

Having a Dropbox application within apps to allow users to grab their files easily is now a must-have, and no longer an additional “special feature.” And this will especially be the case with Dropbox’s launch of Carousel, its photo and video archive and sharing platform.

Try it Out… 

Dropbox are allowing users to test endpoints of the new version. You will need an OAuth 2 access token to make API calls. If you don’t have one already, you can generate one for your own account here. (Do remember this is all in beta form and things may change. Don’t use the endpoints in production yet!)

To make the API calls, here are some options;

 3 Categories of Endpoints:

  1. RPC-Style: The request and response bodies are both JSON
  2. Upload-Style: The request has JSON in the Dropbox-API-Arg header and bulk binary data in the body. The response body is JSON
  3. Download-Style: The request uses the GET method and has JSON in the Dropbox-API-Arg header and nothing in the body. The response has JSON in the Dropbox-API-Result header and bulk binary data in the body

Example of RPC-Style: files/list_folder

Sample Request:

Sample Request: RPC-Style, files/list_folder

 

Sample Response:

RPC Style: Sample Response

 

 

 

 

1500x500

Posted by & filed under Testimonial.

Company

Wedgies

Industry

Polls, Social Media, Voting

Use Case

Is the dress white and gold, or blue and black?

Why Filepicker

Best documentation and API

Highlights

  • Filepicker’s documentation is clear and easy to follow
  • URL option to upload images saves development time
  • According to Wedgies, the Internet says the dress is white and gold

About Wedgies

For 2 years, Wedgies has been the best way to do real-time polls across social media. “Wedgies” are polls you can ask and share across multiple channels to receive feedback in real-time. Wedgies powers simple polling and surveys on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, web pages, blog posts, and live broadcasts.

It’s grown from just being an idea, to raising money, to being a successful business that’s getting a lot of traction. Wedgies has millions of people voting on its polls every month. They also work with large media organizations, like The Weather Channel, Engadget, The Next Web and CrunchBase, which regularly use Wedgies polls in their articles.

Wedgies

Wedgies Needed Filepicker To Locate Images Around The Net To Vote On

The Wedgies team knew that they wanted to allow users to upload photos and animated GIFs to be able to vote on them. At first, they evaluated building an application themselves, but ended up exploring a couple options. They were aware of some but were looking for alternatives.

A software developer by trade, Jimmy Jacobson, Co-founder and CTO of wedgies.com had come across Filepicker when we sponsored 500 Startups. When the Wedgies team looked at Filepicker, they liked the documentation and API.

“What really made us go with Filepicker was not just the great features you guys have, but also the quality of your documentation for developers,” explains Jimmy. “It was super clean, clear and easy to follow. It was much easier to get up and running with Filepicker than it was with your competitors.”

Wedgies Users Like Filepicker’s URL Option For Adding Images To Their Polls

When it comes to using Filepicker, there’s one thing that made it stand out for the Wedgies team and that differentiated it from the rest. Filepicker makes our app easy-to-use with its URL upload tool.

“The feature we like—and that our users really like about Filepicker—is the ability to upload pictures from different sources, not just their own hard drive,” says Jimmy Jacobson. “We know that our customers really like using the URL option for adding images to their polls, because it means they don’t have to download that picture to their own hard drive first.”

 

JimmyJacobsonPeople don’t just keep their images on their hard drive anymore. They keep them on Facebook, Instagram, Giphy and all those other places.”

– Jimmy Jacobson, founder and CTO of wedgies.com

 

Filepicker Helps the Internet Vote For A White And Gold Dress—Or, Is It Blue And Black?

For Wedgies development-wise, the core competency of Filepicker is not simple image uploading or file uploading. The fact that the Filepicker team already thought of the different integrations where people keep their images saves Wedgies development time.

“I would say that Filepicker is the easiest way to let your users upload content to your service,” adds Jimmy Jacobson. “People don’t just keep their images on their hard drive anymore. They keep them on Facebook, Instagram, Giphy and all those other places. So, it makes it easier for our users to connect all their different social media sources to find images to use in their polls.”

Wedgies allows questions to be shared over social media, or embedded on blog posts in a way that’s really engaging for audiences to interact with—thanks to Filepicker.

“A great Filepicker example is Wedgies had the black and blue dress uploaded multiple times. Wedgies users ran multiple polls asking if people think the dress is white and gold, or blue and black,” explains Jimmy Jacobson. “The Internet really seems to come down on the side of white and gold on that question.”

waterfall

Posted by & filed under Working with Filepicker.

The more images, the better. And have another million or so additional files that will create the best-looking, most interactive and profitable site ever. Just upload and let the cash roll in.

It’s that easy. Or so believes the creative people in your business. They may know the trigger points – images, social profiles, downloadable files – to get users on board, but they tend to forget about the small issue in distributing such a volume of files to global users in real-time.

File infrastructure is a concept lost to many in the creative side. And this is why you never put them and developers in the same room for too long!

Having a multitude of files naturally helps create stickiness to a site. That is a no-brainer. But speed and ease of access has to naturally match this offering. And while the Filepicker Web Framework can work its magic on large file uploads, it is not designed to be used as a high performance platform for serving files.

To get the best performance for high loads and ensure a greater end-user experience, our web framework can and should be used in conjunction with a Content Delivery Network (CDN).

In simple terms, a CDN will download the files from Filepicker once and serve the file off CDN geo-located servers for all future requests. With endpoints dotted all over the world, this allows for greater end-user speed, access and display of files.

Is it for your company? Well, it depends on the volume of files that you deal with. Most e-commerce sites, for example, use CDN. It can also prove more economical
to use CDN compared to downloading files from Filepicker each time.

There are many CDN providers now available, such as EdgeCast, Microsoft Azure and Amazon’s CloudFront. For this example, we are using CloudFront’s CDN. However, the integration process will likely be similar.

How it works?

Step 1:

To use CloudFront, you will need to set up an account with Amazon Web Services.

Step 2:

On the configuration screen, enter the following options;

image02

Step 3:

After logging in, select the link to CloudFront.

image01

Step 4:

From the CloudFront screen, click Create Distribution. For the following screen, select Download and click Continue.

image00

In approximately 30 minutes, your CDN will be ready.

Step 5:
Once your CloudFront endpoint is set up, you will need to find the domain name for your endpoint. The domain name can be found in the Domain Name column in the CloudFront distribution table.

image03

 

It will return a random domain string. This domain can be substituted where formerly you would use www.filepicker.io.

If you previously served files from https://www.filepicker.io/api/file/JhJKMtnRDW9uLYcnkRKW to serve them from CloudFront, you would use https://dr8a9aabb917x.cloudfront.net/api/file/JhJKMtnRDW9uLYcnkRKW.

And that is how easy it can be done. Ask us more: contact@filepicker.com for information on using CDN today.

 

 

 

Matthew Simantov

Posted by & filed under Thoughts and Knowledge.

Competition brings out the best in products and worst in men. Or so said David Sarnoff, the guy credited with developing the communications industry in the U.S.

ChallengePost_logo-7068dde384457e8bb0df644211db381dThere are many on ChallengePost – the platform that powers online challenges and in-person hackathons – that may have a different view on Sarnoff’s statement. Including many of our own clients that fight it out in (kind of) friendly hackathons and online challenges.

Such competitions may not have Simon Cowell or cheesy elimination tasks, but ChallengePost winners (and “losers”) tends to produce more than one-hit wonders. And they certainly get a lot more from entering Hackathons and showcasing their software projects than those who seek that allusive 15 minutes of fame on one of Cowell’s TV shows.

Quilt – an app that uses Filepicker.

The prize money and other rewards may make the adrenaline-pumping workload and intense pressure worth it, but it’s the long-term opportunities that everyone has their eyes on. Free feedback and a fresh perspective from like-minded people can only strengthen an innovative product, transforming it from a small idea to a big creation that will have angel investors fighting over you like a superstar.

Just like it did for GroupMe, conceived at TechCrunch Disrupt in 2010. While the group text messaging app did not win anything at the one-day hackathon, it did get a bit of investor attention. Less than one year later, it was sold for $85 million.

GroupMe attributes its rapid success to the use of the Twillo API, a relationship that began that very first day of the TechCrunch hackathon. Get the right API to play with for these contests and you never know what may happen…

a5f.banner_nycTriptography, an app created for the 24-hour Photo Hack Day NYC, can attest to that. They ended up using 14 different APIs, including Filepicker, and created a slick travel app where users can search for local suggestions for a city and get image-based results.

And their hard work led to a litany of awards, including the Photo Organization Prize, Best Foursquare Hack, and Best Filepicker Hack. And this is only the beginning for Triptography (read about how they use Filepicker’s API).

3 Tips to succeed in a Hackathon:

1. Get to know the vendors/sponsors

Companies want you to play with their APIs, so you can create that something special on the day. We, for example, helped Brandfolder compete in Google’s GovDev Challenge last year. Use this opportunity to get help from people like us to build your project, create long-standing working relationships and free guidance. It’s networking that could lead to a lot more.

2. Do your Homework

Many hackathons do not allow you to write code beforehand, but you can leverage existing open source libraries. Get to know the API and understand how the various libraries work and how you are going to use them on the day of the event. This will save you precious time and avoid headaches, allowing you the time to concentrate on building the functionality of your app.

3. Think big, build small

No matter how much of a genius you are or how much coffee you consume on the day, it is highly unlikely that you will create version 1.0 of your product. Especially in the crazy working environment of a Hackathon. At the end of 24-hours, you need something that will work and is demoable. Take the time to` build good, simple functionality. Less is definitely more in these situations.

If you want Filepicker to sponsor your Hackathon, let us know – support@filepicker.io